Bad lifting videos

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RandomJabroni
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Jul 03, 2019 5:50 pm

Bad lifting videos

Post by RandomJabroni » Fri Jul 05, 2019 11:41 am

Are we doing our field any favors by posting videos of other athletes lifting poorly, and then publicly bashing the strength coach who posted it, or even worse, arguing with high school kids about how they don’t know what they’re doing and need new oversight? Imagine Nick Saban getting online to bash a HS athlete with bad pass rushing technique.

It’s a tough pill for me to swallow to see coaches on the front line publicly demanding more respect as a field, but also publicly cannibaliizing our own.



JustAGuy
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:13 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by JustAGuy » Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:18 pm

I would have to agree. Posting others videos to publicly shame or make fun of what we are seeing is far beneath a true professional. I think instead of bashing the individual maybe we should reach out to that individual and offer some sound advice, maybe they don’t know what they don’t know, and we as professionals can aid in making there programs both better and safer.

PeterTheWhabbit
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 05, 2019 8:36 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by PeterTheWhabbit » Fri Jul 05, 2019 9:14 pm

LOVE THIS THREAD. It absolutely drives me insane watching all of the hate that is spewed on social media. If strength coaches want to see more respect, higher salaries and more value in their career then why are we tearing each other down and devaluing what we do? What’s the solution? I don’t think there is a clear answer. I don’t think it’s ones responsibility to randomly DM a coach and try and fix what they didn’t like in a video. I also don’t think well known coaches with high amounts of followers should bash the video because that opens the flood gates for everyone else to bash. What if we just praise “good” (what we deem as good) training and ignore training we deem as “bad” ?

Diamond_Cutter
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 05, 2019 9:33 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by Diamond_Cutter » Fri Jul 05, 2019 9:48 pm

A good thing I’m starting to notice is that both athletes & the general public are becoming more knowledgeable in regards to good S&C practices. 5 years ago, a bad squat with a lot weight from a professional athlete would be viewed as an impressive feat by 95% of people. Now, just by looking at the comment threads on such videos, more people are realizing it’s just a bad squat, regardless of the weight on the bar. I’ve had athletes send me videos of bad training stuff they see online. This tells me, more people w/o S&C backgrounds are becoming more knowledgeable. I think this relates to bad training videos being posted. I don’t think there’s a need to publicly bash said videos/posts. It’s our job to continue putting out high-level videos, and in doing so, other coaches will hopefully learn to coach up their movements better, thus improving the profession as a whole.

HSCoachS&C
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:29 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by HSCoachS&C » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:40 pm

Let me put a new perspective on this. Whenever I see a video that is not a good representation of what out profession is about, but puts off to those outside of the fraternity of coaching and also to young athletes that strive to be like the ones they see as stars, I believe that I am OBLIGATED to say something. How I say it, however is very important. I am not criticizing the athlete. It is hardly their fault. I am criticizing the ones responsible for the training that claims to be a "professional".

I believe if we say nothing, we are just as responsible. A lot of the times it is not about what we preach, but what we tolerate. I want to take the same approach that I would to anyone I am mentoring, coaching, or teaching. When a video like that emerges, every coach needs to be held accountable. If they cannot give specific context and understanding of what they are prescribing, coaching, allowing, etc., then we as coaches need to create relationships to fix it.

The problem I run into when taking this approach is coaches having an ego the size of my garage door. When asked these contextual questions, coaches who do not have an answer often deflect with answers such as "I've been doing this for 15 years", or something of that nature. This is the same answer I get from sport coaches at both the college level and high school level when I ask for a reason.

At the end of the day, all that we need is for coaches to be able to give a proper description of why the exercise type, volume, intensity, and implementation is being used for their specific population. The sad part is, majority of strength coaches cant even do this. And that is bruising to their ego and self-worth, so they immediately deflect..

BUT, on the other side, a lot of coaches who want to point out these problems often point them out because it differs from how they implement training, not because they see a true issue. This happens OFTEN. These coaches do so because they believe their self-worth and identity as a coach is being threatened. EGO IS THE ABSOLUTE ISSUE IN OUR PROFESSION. PERIOD.

Don't flinch when you put out something that seems like garbage and someone does not ask about it. I know I expect every single one of my colleagues to hold me to the highest standard possible. OUR ATHLETES AND STUDENTS DESERVE IT.

Austin316
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jul 06, 2019 1:17 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by Austin316 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:44 pm

Topic seems to always pop up and it’s valid. Coming from my coaching background I was taught many things early one that I find out today people think is groundbreaking instead of the basic knowledge. Our profession is very diluted we only get the respect we deserve because there are ppl putting things our lt there that believe they are doing good things and are fine both at the private level and the collegiate level. I’ve seen ppl allow bad technique for the sake of “mental toughness.” We are so concerned with numbers as a whole organization we forget our first rule. “Do no harm” our excuse is “well we have to stress the bodies limitations to get optimal adaptation blah blah blah. It’s bullshit and we are putting our own egos ahead of our own job. If those videos they don’t need to be publicly bashed because it does display a weak, and dis-unified organization. I believe their should be a conversation to the individuals who post things and to make sure there is proper content. We don’t know people’s story, it could be a kid cleaning and it looks ehh at best but it’s leaps and bounds better than he was and that’s an accomplishment. That is a great buildup if you’ve worked in the private sector majority of your athlete/clients will be uncoordinated. So to be at a certain degree of progression in the process could be making that athlete proud.

I believe at the end of it all, public bashing needs to stop in many avenues of our distinguished profession as well as better communication when it comes to education. We complain about pay, and that ATs make a certain amount however we don’t have ppl fighting for a union, or fighting for higher standards to become professionals. There is a lot that needs to be fixed, I believe we are scratching the surfac

Diamond_Cutter
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 05, 2019 9:33 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by Diamond_Cutter » Fri Jul 12, 2019 9:47 pm

I've seen more bad lifting videos today from college S&C programs than I have from high school and/or the private sector in a long time. Just sayin. People will call out the private sector trainers or stuff from high schools all the time, but I've yet to see any "big name" programs or strength coaches publicly called out for bad training stuff. Let's be real. If significant changes are going to happen across the "industry," it'll happen at the top and trickle its way down, not the other way around. People rag on pro athletes for the way they train, saying this is how most people will think pro athletes train or how they got there. It's a 2-way street. SOME High school coaches see what those at the top level do, and assume that's how they should train their athletes. In my mind, you can't rag on those in the private sector, but then turn a blind eye to similarly bad coaching happening at the college level.

We can point fingers all we want at other areas of the industry, but there are a lot of issues, relating to coaching, that need to be fixed at the college level.

JustAGuy
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:13 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

Post by JustAGuy » Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:35 pm

I am going to have to agree with the previous post. Some of the Coaches most consider “top tier” based on their teams win/loss record are truly far from it. They have been blessed with “top tier” athletes. Al of these programs win despite the horrid strength and conditioning program that they run. Some of these programs are just bad. Zero care for anything resembling a quality program.

Most of these guys have little or no consideration for what proper technique really is, most are just glorified hype men if you ask me, who purely chasing numbers at the expense of the athletes. This is primarily for their own ego.

Srey Pov
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2020 8:00 pm

Re: Bad lifting videos

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